Posts tagged ‘exhibition’

September 13, 2011

Chris Floyd: 140 Characters @ Host Gallery

Chris Floyd at Host Gallery by Foto8 140 characters project

July 15, 2011

Paradalia AUCB BA Photography Degree Show 2011 LONDON

Paradalia AUCB (Arts University College at Bournemouth) BA (Hons) Photography Graduate ShowEdward Lynn - Static, Paradalia Exhibition 2011[Edward Lynn Static, featuring in Paradalia]

Paradalia
Free Range
 @ The Old Truman Brewery, London
21st-25th July 2011

Private View: Thursday 21st  July 2011, 6pm onwards

Elise Price Stoney Cross AUCB Paradalia Graduate Show[Stoney Cross from the series Stoney Cross USAAF  No.416 by Elise Price]

An alternative to the Commercial Photography degree course at the Arts University College at Bournemouth (formerly The Arts Institute at Bournemouth) is he BA Photography – often recognized as the ‘Fine Art Photography’ degree program which is ‘underpinned by historical and critical approaches to the medium of photography’.

Students from this course are encouraged to challenge the limitations of the medium through contemporary practice, often resulting the kind of intimate, subtle and crafted imagery you would expect from a fine artist.

This year’s graduates are exhibiting their work under ‘Paradalia‘ at the Free Range exhibition in the Old Truman Brewery, London.

For more information, please visit their website at: http://www.paradalia.co.uk/


June 23, 2011

Curious AUCB BA Commercial Photography Graduate Exhibition LONDON

Anna Michell 2011 Curious Photography Exhibition

[Jeanne by Anna Michell]

AUCB Curious Photography Graduate ExhibitionAUCB Commercial Photography FdA / BA Graduate Showcase

5th – 9th July 2011
Private View: Thursday 7th July

The Print Space
74 Kingsland Road
London E2 8DL

Wolfgang Tillmans, Nick Knight and, more recently, Leon Diaper – just some of the most notable alumni of the Arts University College at Bournemouth (formerly the Arts Institute at Bournemouth) photography courses. With its outstanding reputation on the international creative platform, the graduates of this institution have nothing short of big shoes to fill. Though it is in this pressure to succeed alongside their provocative studies at the institute, which lead to some of the most impressive and enticing graduate work outside of London.

This years graduates of the FdA & BA Commercial Photography Degree are no exception to the rule. Crossing the realms of fashion, portraiture and reportage, their collective exhibition entitled ‘Curious‘, will be both a celebration of their three years of study and their inaugural welcome into the professional photography industry.

Hannah Garrod Jacqueline Boulton Curious AUCB Photography Graduate Exhibition

[The Hunter & The Hunted by Hannah Garrod]

Featuring the works of: Anna Michell, Hannah Garrod, Ben Quinton, Ina Halsor, Abi Currie, Joseph Fox, Leanne Lim-Walker, Roman Sakovich, Stephanie Snooks, Stephanie Dale, Rose Duffy, Rob Deacon, Montana Lowery, Amy Maidment, Catherine Benett, Rebekah Hayes, Holly Cox, Luke Hutchings and Nicola Smith.

Visit the Curious Graduate Show website for further details
www.curiousgraduateshow.co.uk  

Images in this post curtosy of Anna Michell & Hannah Garrod

June 4, 2011

Ben Roberts The Gathering Clouds 17/06/11

Ben Roberts – The Gathering Clouds

Third Floor Gallery
18th June – 25th July

Private View: 17th June, 19:00

Ben Roberts Gathering Clouds - Carrer Virginia Wolf 2009[Ben Roberts Carrer Virginia Wolf – May 2009]

Running from the 18th June 2011 until 25th July at the Third Floor Gallery in Cardiff (Wales), Ben Robert’s inaugural solo exhibition entitled, The Gathering Clouds,  presents the changing face of Spain’s social and physical landscape. Initiated as a holiday trip whereupon Roberts “found a landscape imbued with a strange mix of anxiety and tension, where the delineation between nature and city had become ambiguous“,  the project took form over the length of three years were Roberts documented the spaces and people around Spain who found themselves affected by the economic downturn. Prior to the crisis, Spain had been in the midst of a huge construction boom fuelled by the country’s tourism industry with plans for a grand rejuvenation of Spain’s architectural landscape. When faced with the global recession, Spain’s development were forced into remission, scarring the country with vast areas of vacant developments.

Spain has always been one of the most popular destinations for UK and EU holiday makers, favoured for its warm climate, rustic authenticity and, of course, cuisine. In seeing the images from The Gathering Clouds our illusions of Spain’s tourism grandeur are flattened by the, ironically, bleak desolation of the landscape. Images of the abandoned, half-constructed estates conflict with our imagined perception of the Spain once revered for its cultural heritage with artists like Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dali and Juan Gris; its bullfighters and passionate dance. Through Robert’s images, we are invited to view the Spain that has been left void and sorrowful, perhaps drawing the viewer to enquire which is the more honest perception of the country.

Ben Roberts - Calle Ojos Del Salado - The Gathering Clouds[Ben Roberts Calle Ojos Del Salado – September 2007]

Roberts, a talented British documentary photographer, was honoured by Nikon and the British Journal of Photography for The Gathering Clouds in 2009 by receiving their prestigious Project Assistance Award. There is also mention on Robert’s blog that he is considering holding a three-day workshop for a small number of participants, exploring the urban fringe of the South Wales industrial landscape – make sure to view Ben Robert’s Blog directly for updates on this.

Find more of Ben Roberts photography on his website here.

March 26, 2011

Aires de Jeux, Champs de Tensions Playgrounds, Fields of Tensions

photography exhibitions montpellier, south of france, wolfgang tillmans

Aires de Jeux, Champs de Tensions // Playgrounds, Fields of Tension.
Figures de la photographie urbaine en Europe depuis 1970.
Figures in European urban photography since 1970.

Currently showing at: Pavillon Populaire, Montpellier France.
25th February – 24th April 2011

Featuring the works of:

Bogdan Dziworski My View, Polish Impressions in Photography 1970
Seiichi Furuya Berlin-Est 1980
Jitka Hanslova Bewohner / Habitants 1994-1997
Helmut Kandi
Chris Killip In Fragrante 1988
Boris Mikailov At Dusk 1993
Muntean-Rosenblum To Die For 2001
David Rosenfeld Charades 1999
Christoph Rutimann Handlauf: Picadilly 2007
Micheal Schmidt Waffenruhe 1980
Wolfgang Tillmans Subways in London
Octavian Trauttmansdorff
Sergej Vutuc

 

Jitka Hanzlova Bewohner Habitants[Jitka Hanzlova Bewohner]

On Regarding the Exhibits

Having been previously unacquainted with her work, it was a pleasure to view Bewohner by Jitka Hanzlova. This corpus studies the inhabitants of a bleak industrialized estate where the modern buildings of the early 90s cast a disjointed and dismal shadow over their environment. The images are softly spoken, they appear to document the inhabitants but in the same instance it is unavoidable to leave the firm gaze of each subject. They are at once quiet and strong; humbling the viewer through their prevalent presence in the frame. Combined with the soft, sombre tonal palette of Bewohner, Jitka Hanzlova raises the question; how much does our environment truly reflect within us?

 

Octavian Trauttmannsdorff CCTV photography[Octavian Trauttmansdorff]

 

Octavian Trauttmansdorff 1994[Octavian Trauttmansdorff]


Aires de Jeux, Champs de Tension, as exhibited in the Pavillon Populaire in Montpellier, France, donates a large expanse of running wall to a continuous photographic installation by Octavian Trauttmansdorff. The way the space is laid out, it is unavoidable but to walk past the entire piece as it dominates one side of a narrow pathway down the upstairs exhibition space. When I had encountered the first specimen of this work in the downstairs gallery space I gave it a glance and walked on by – assuming on appearence that it was ‘not my cup of tea’. However, when funnelled through the upstairs gallery space I realised the impact the work was bearing on me. It was not that I simply wanted to avoid the piece because I was not interested, but I wanted to actively remove myself from it. The scale of the work – encompassing a good metre plus in height and traversing the entire side of a gallery wall (approx 10m) – created a virtual window to a busy urban space. On the most part, the subjects walked past (or was it me walking past them?) but occasionally one of them caught my glimpse and met my eyes in a penetrating stare – it was in these brief encounters that I realised the weight of Trauttmansdorff’s work; I had become a very active voyeur in his world and his subjects seemed to know it. In addition, Trauttmansdorff’s method of applying his images to the paper, through what appears to be having painted on the developer and fixative loosely before working back into the piece with knives and tension – creating fissures and breaks in the piece, lends me to question the similarity of this presentation to the advertising posters you might see on the underground. As if Trauttmansdorff is putting you, or us, back into the equation. Questioning whether we are looking; whether we should be looking.


The exhibition’s book, including work and essays on all the featured artists can be purchased here.